Gut Bacteria Imbalance Linked to Chronic Fatigue

Connection Found in Patients

Ben Schonewille /

Fifty healthy patients and 50 with chronic fatigue syndrome were tested for bacteria and immune molecules by researchers from Columbia University. They discovered that imbalances in the levels of certain gut bacteria are prevalent in individuals with chronic fatigue syndrome, a disorder often accompanied by extreme fatigue, muscle and joint pain, cognitive issues and insomnia.

This article appears in the December 2017 issue of Natural Awakenings.

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