People that Don’t Slight Sleep Eat Better

More Rest Equates to Healthy Eating




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Those that sleep more than seven hours a night are likely to eat better the following day, according to researchers from King’s College London. In the study, 21 people known to typically sleep fewer than seven hours increased their sleep time by 47 minutes after receiving tips on sleep hygiene such as drinking less caffeine and going to bed neither too hungry nor too full. The following day, they consumed almost 10 fewer grams of sugar in food and drinks on average and also consumed less fat and fewer carbohydrates than a control group.


This article appears in the June 2018 issue of Natural Awakenings.

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